Music Curriculum Intent

In Music, our intent is built on our belief that music learning works best when all pupils are making music within the classroom. The curriculum respects all pupils, no matter what their ability or experience, they are treated as musicians, and are supported to learn and develop inclusively at their own level. A singing strategy is at the heart of the department and vocal work plays a significant role in pupil development. Singing is one of the most positive forms of human activity, supporting physical, mental, emotional and social health, as well as individual development in the same areas. Successful singing is important because it builds self-confidence, promotes self-esteem, always engages emotion, promotes social inclusion, supports social skill development, and enables pupils of different ages and abilities to come together successfully to create something special in the arts. The relevance of repertoire is chosen with pupils in mind, yet it also broadens pupils’ musical horizons whilst making learning engaging. Pupils perform, compose and listen to music through a varied medium of voices, instruments and use of technology, whilst exploring the Inter-related Dimensions of Music. Musical activities, with biases towards singing, contribute positively to the development of pupils’ vocabulary, numeracy and literacy skills. All pupils are given the opportunity to showcase and celebrate their work at different levels – in class, in school and in public. Musical experiences are of high quality with clear progression routes to the next key stage or extracurricular activity. Extension opportunities for enthusiastic pupils who want more music are available in the form of weekly instrumental/vocal tuition and ensemble activities are open to all. The music department has links to the music industry, which enhance opportunities with professional musicians, such as freelance musicians, further education establishments, local theatres and the South Tyneside & Gateshead Music Hub. Social and creative skills are nurtured within the classroom and also via extracurricular activities. Above all, we understand the importance of music in enhancing everyone’s lives and we aim for every one of our pupils to leave this school with a life-long love of music. 

At KS3, pupils learn through a vocal curriculum. Pupils perform, compose and listen to music whilst exploring the Inter-related Dimensions of Music. 

At KS4, pupils follow the AQA GCSE Music specification: https://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/music/gcse/music-8271 

Year 7

(Modules, Topics)

Autumn

Bridging Unit

Spring

Speech/Rap/Beatboxing 

Summer

Ukulele

Year 8

(Modules, Topics)

Autumn

Jazz 

Spring

Ukulele 

Summer

Samba

Year 9

(Modules, Topics)

Autumn

Popular Song

Spring

Electronic Dance Music

Summer

Music for Video Game

Year 10 -11

(Modules, Topics) 

Component 1

Understanding Music

Component 2

Performing Music 

Component 3

Composing Music 

Key Stage 3

Year 7

Audio recording of each pupil (1-part vocals) is made during each assessment cycle to monitor pupil progress.  Formative assessment is carried out as pupil success is noted and targets for improvement are awarded.

Year 8

Audio recording of each pupil (2-part vocals) is made during each assessment cycle to monitor pupil progress.  Formative assessment is carried out as pupil success is noted and targets for improvement are awarded.

Year 9

Audio recording of each pupil (3-part vocals) is made during each assessment cycle to monitor pupil progress.  Formative assessment is carried out as pupil success is noted and targets for improvement are awarded.

Key Stage 4

Year 10

Audio recording of each pupil’s performance is made during each assessment cycle to monitor pupil progress. Pupil’s composition is awarded success and targets for improvement. Understanding of music is assessed and grades (9-1) are awarded. 

Year 11

Audio recording of each pupil’s performance is made during each assessment cycle to monitor pupil progress. Pupil’s composition is awarded success and targets for improvement. Understanding of music is assessed and grades (9-1) are awarded. 

Assessment Cycle 1

Year 7

One-part vocal performance is recorded as an audio file.  The performance is marked using formative assessment in which strengths and targets for improvement are shared.   

Listening skills are assessed at the start of each lesson.  

Year 8

Two-part vocal performance is recorded as an audio file.  The performance is marked using formative assessment in which strengths and targets for improvement are shared.   

Listening skills are assessed at the start of each lesson. 

Year 9

Three-part vocal performance is recorded as an audio file.  The performance is marked using formative assessment in which strengths and targets for improvement are shared.   

Listening skills are assessed at the start of each lesson. 

Year 10

GCSE solo and ensemble performances are recorded as audio files.  The performances are marked against the AQA grading criteria. 

Component 1 is assessed throughout the course using mock GCSE paper questions. 

Component 3 is assessed following the completion of pupils’ controlled assessment. 

Year 11

GCSE solo and ensemble performances are recorded as audio files.  The performances are marked against the AQA grading criteria. 

Component 1 is assessed throughout the course using mock GCSE paper questions. 

Component 3 is assessed following the completion of pupils’ controlled assessment. 

Assessment Cycle 1

Year 7

One-part vocal performance is recorded as an audio file.  The performance is marked using formative assessment in which strengths and targets for improvement are shared.   

Listening skills are assessed at the start of each lesson.  

Year 8

Two-part vocal performance is recorded as an audio file.  The performance is marked using formative assessment in which strengths and targets for improvement are shared.   

Listening skills are assessed at the start of each lesson. 

Year 9

Three-part vocal performance is recorded as an audio file.  The performance is marked using formative assessment in which strengths and targets for improvement are shared.   

Listening skills are assessed at the start of each lesson. 

Year 10

GCSE solo and ensemble performances are recorded as audio files.  The performances are marked against the AQA grading criteria. 

Component 1 is assessed throughout the course using mock GCSE paper questions. 

Component 3 is assessed following the completion of pupils’ controlled assessment. 

Year 11

GCSE solo and ensemble performances are recorded as audio files.  The performances are marked against the AQA grading criteria. 

 

Component 1 is assessed throughout the course using mock GCSE paper questions. 

Component 3 is assessed following the completion of pupils’ controlled assessment. 

Assessment Cycle 2

Year 7

One-part vocal performance is recorded as an audio file.  The performance is marked using formative assessment in which strengths and targets for improvement are shared.   

Listening skills are assessed at the start of each lesson.  

Year 8

Two-part vocal performance is recorded as an audio file.  The performance is marked using formative assessment in which strengths and targets for improvement are shared.   

Listening skills are assessed at the start of each lesson. 

Year 9

Three-part vocal performance is recorded as an audio file.  The performance is marked using formative assessment in which strengths and targets for improvement are shared.   

Listening skills are assessed at the start of each lesson. 

Year 10

GCSE solo and ensemble performances are recorded as audio files.  The performances are marked against the AQA grading criteria. 

Component 1 is assessed throughout the course using mock GCSE paper questions. 

Component 3 is assessed following the completion of pupils’ controlled assessment. 

Year 11

GCSE solo and ensemble performances are recorded as audio files.  The performances are marked against the AQA grading criteria. 

Component 1 is assessed throughout the course using mock GCSE paper questions. 

Component 3 is assessed following the completion of pupils’ controlled assessment.

Sound engineering 

DJing 

Choreography 

Music publishing 

Backing singer 

Classical music 

Arts administrator 

TV and radio production 

Radio presenter 

Music journalism 

Music therapy 

Composing 

Events management 

Festival organising 

Stage managing